Prom 15: LPO/Jurowski review – orchestral visionary signs out in style

Proms 2021Royal Albert Hall, LondonVladimir Jurowskis earned his end-of-evening medal with a refined display featuring a blazing ode to artistic integritySat 14 Aug 2021 07.03 EDTVladimir Jurowskis Prom with the London Philharmonic was his last performance as the orchestras principal conductor and whether by accident or design, his program of mainly 20th-century music closed with Hindemiths Mathis der Maler Symphony, a work that to some degree appeared emblematic of his period. Jurowski has been radical in his innovative scheduling and his decision to redefine the specifications of the repertory: the symphony, which premiered in 1934 and draws its product from Hindemiths opera about the life of Matthias Grünewald, delivers an intense need for the preservation of creative stability by remaining unswervingly real to ones vision.Alert to the symphonys mix of rigour, stress and appeal, Jurowski performed with amazing fervour and intensity. Textures were clear yet warm, with a wonderful shimmer in the string chords that introduce the visionary Engelkonzert at the start, the woodwind poised yet grieving in the sorrowing central Grablegung, the brass blazing with assertion in the last peroration that sweeps away the expressionist terrors of the climactic Temptation of St Anthony. It was a remarkably great achievement.Its companion pieces were Stravinskys Jeu de Cartes and Waltons Cello Concerto together with Friedrich Goldmanns 1977 orchestration of Bachs Goldberg Canons: effective supplements to the Goldberg Variations, they were only discovered in 1975 when Bachs manuscript emerged in a private collection in France. Goldmann makes no effort to mimic baroque scoring, and his plan for modern instruments, ironically, sounds in locations more like Hindemith than Bach, though it was made with exceptional clearness and grace.Stravinskys poker-game ballet, with its nods to Tchaikovsky and Rossini, was all impudent wit and precision. Steven Isserlis, the musician in the Walton, had fun with significant virtuosity and refinement, though neither he nor Jurowski might disguise the fact that the works final movement, dubbed Theme and Improvisations, is worryingly episodic.When the performance was over Jurowski existed with the Royal Philharmonic Societys gold medal in acknowledgment of his work, an award most richly was worthy of. topLeft We will be in touch to remind you to contribute. Watch out for a message in your inbox in October 2021. Please contact us if you have any concerns about contributing.

Senior Proms 2021Royal Albert Hall, LondonVladimir Jurowskis earned his end-of-evening medal with a refined display screen featuring a blazing ode to creative integritySat 14 Aug 2021 07.03 EDTVladimir Jurowskis Prom with the London Philharmonic was his last concert as the orchestras principal conductor and whether by accident or style, his program of largely 20th-century music closed with Hindemiths Mathis der Maler Symphony, a work that to some degree appeared emblematic of his period. Jurowski has been extreme in his innovative scheduling and his decision to redefine the criteria of the repertory: the symphony, which premiered in 1934 and draws its material from Hindemiths opera about the life of Matthias Grünewald, provides an intense demand for the preservation of creative integrity by remaining unswervingly true to ones vision.Alert to the symphonys mix of rigour, tension and beauty, Jurowski conducted with remarkable fervour and strength. It was a remarkably fine achievement.Its companion pieces were Stravinskys Jeu de Cartes and Waltons Cello Concerto together with Friedrich Goldmanns 1977 orchestration of Bachs Goldberg Canons: efficient supplements to the Goldberg Variations, they were just discovered in 1975 when Bachs manuscript came to light in a personal collection in France. Goldmann makes no attempt to mimic baroque scoring, and his arrangement for modern instruments, paradoxically, sounds in locations more like Hindemith than Bach, though it was done with exceptional clarity and grace.Stravinskys poker-game ballet, with its nods to Tchaikovsky and Rossini, was all impudent wit and precision. Steven Isserlis, the soloist in the Walton, played with considerable virtuosity and improvement, though neither he nor Jurowski could disguise the truth that the works last motion, dubbed Theme and Improvisations, is worryingly episodic.When the concert was over Jurowski was provided with the Royal Philharmonic Societys gold medal in acknowledgment of his work, an award most highly was worthy of.

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