The billion dollar race to defy ageing is the last thing the planet needs | John Harris

The World Health Organization says that by 2030, 1.4 billion– or one in six– individuals in the world will be aged 60 or over, and the number of individuals aged 80 or older is anticipated to triple in between 2020 and 2050, to 426 million. Half of all people in the UK aged 75 or over live alone– and, according to the charity Age UK, half a million people over the age of 60 normally invest each day in solitude.Thinking about eternal youth may be a diverting intellectual workout. As a matter of clinical reality, we understand that strong and stable relationships and immersion in neighborhoods result in people living longer and healthier lives, and the isolation that too frequently grips individualss later years has the reverse result.

The World Health Organization says that by 2030, 1.4 billion– or one in six– people in the world will be aged 60 or over, and the number of individuals aged 80 or older is anticipated to triple in between 2020 and 2050, to 426 million. Half of all individuals in the UK aged 75 or over live alone– and, according to the charity Age UK, half a million people over the age of 60 typically spend each day in solitude.Thinking about eternal youth might be a diverting intellectual exercise. As a matter of clinical truth, we know that strong and steady relationships and immersion in communities result in individuals living longer and healthier lives, and the isolation that too frequently grips individualss later years has the reverse result. As against the cliche of retirement to the nation or coast, would it be great for older people to live nearer the centre of cities and, if so, how would that work? Here is what the immortalism of well-known capitalists rather neglects: that the most immediate route to living much better and longer lies not in hacking our cells, however assisting people to be more human.

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